Transportation In Rio

The coastal city of Rio de Janeiro has a variety of transportation options. A wonderful, sprawling city, travel times can vary greatly depending on the destination and mode of travel, but most major hotels, attractions, restaurants and Olympic venues can be reached by various transportation methods.

For the Summer Games, Roadtrips’ guests will receive assistance from our onsite team in arranging transportation and making transportation choices to help get to their events and to explore the Cidade Maravilhosa (the Marvelous City). For many of our guests, a mix of taxis and pre-chartered private vehicles will be the best solution.

Taxi:

taxi

Rio taxis are one of the most convenient and comfortable ways to get around. They operate by meter with varied rates depending on the day and time. Drivers are quite knowledgeable but rarely speak English, so we recommend that passengers have their destination written down or listed on their portable electronic device. Yellow taxis are licensed and are the official service in Rio; they are plentiful and the fares are reasonable. The biggest hurdle can be traffic; roads are often faced with congestion, particularly at rush hour.

Another option is the Radio Taxi, generally green, blue or white vehicles. You’ll pay a premium for these but they tend to run higher quality vehicles and are very safe and reliable. They are arranged through a hotel or by calling directly. Prices are fixed and set in advance. It’s also good to note that most taxis are small and fit a maximum of 3-4 guests.

HOW WILL I GET AROUND?

For the Summer Games, Roadtrips’ guests will receive assistance from our onsite team in arranging transportation and making transportation choices to help get to their events and to explore the Cidade Maravilhosa (the Marvelous City). For many of our guests, a mix of taxis and pre-chartered private vehicles will be the best solution.

Private Chartered Vehicles:

Roadtrips can arrange for a private vehicle for those preferring the comforts of a dedicated car. We recommend securing these in advance to guarantee availability, particularly for larger groups, as demand will be high. In addition, our hosts will work onsite during the Summer Games with guests, concierges, and transportation coordinators at our premium hotels to make private chartered vehicles arrangements on request, where available.

Metro:

Rio’s subway system is relatively new and rather small for a city so large. There are three lines: Line 1 (orange line) which operates in the Central and South Zones, which include the main tourist locations of Copacabana and Ipanema; Line 2 (green line) which serves the more residential areas towards the north; and most importantly for our Summer Games guests, Line 4 (blue line) that will link Ipanema to the Barra da Tijuca neighborhood, home to the Olympic Park. The metro may seem overwhelming at first, but with a bit of familiarization regarding the routes and stations it becomes easier to understand and is reliable, safe and clean. In general, the metro operates Monday through Saturday from 5 a.m. to midnight, and on Sundays and holidays from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. There is expansion work being done on the metro in preparation for the 2016 Summer Games, including additional stations in the South Zone and the completion of Line 4’s link to Barra.

Bus:

trafficBuses serve almost all of Rio de Janeiro, operate 24 hours a day, and are the most inexpensive method of transportation. It can be a bit confusing to navigate the bus system due to language and routing challenges, therefore we’d suggest planning the trip in advance with assistance as drivers will not generally speak English. Fares are paid directly to the driver in cash. Be cautious: avoid buses at night, guard your personal belongings, and stick to the main routes.

Car Rental:

As there are so many transportation options in Rio, a car hire isn’t necessary or required to get around. Navigating the streets of Rio is not for the faint of heart – many roads operate a one-way system and traffic jams can be common. Finding parking can also be challenging in Rio. For those feeling brave, Rio has all the major international car rental agencies including a selection of Brazilian companies. Ensure that you have proper insurance and good maps.

Walking:

Walking is a great way to discover the beachside districts of Copacabana, Arpoador and Ipanema. They are lively, scenic, and chock full of restaurants, bars and shops. The bohemian neighborhoods of Santa Teresa and Lapa can also be explored by foot as an excellent way to soak in the history and vibrant culture in these artistic areas. Pedestrians should be mindful of directions and avoid walking in some areas at night.

Cycling:

Cycling is becoming increasing popular in Rio. With the benefits of providing exercise, avoiding traffic and choosing a more sustainable way to get around, cycling paths and bicycle racks are popping up all across the city. Specified routes are well marked. A public bike rental system is in place, and shops that specialize in rentals are also easily accessible.

Ferry:

A lesser-known transportation option is the ferry service. Many Cariocas live in Niteroi (Rio’s sister city) and commute the short distance to Rio for work, via Guanabara Bay. Millions of passengers travel every year by ferry on fleets of varying capacities. There are numerous services between these two cities; they are frequent and inexpensive. While it’s not a serviceable option for getting around Rio itself, it’s great for those wanting to visit the Niteroi Art Museum or to take in the beautiful views.

Book Your Trip to the Summer Games

Call a Sports Travel Specialist at 1-800-465-1765 or